A New Kind of Culture

After watching “An anthropological introduction to YouTube” I became more interested in the culture of participation that Wesch mentioned. In case you don’t know, participatory culture “is a culture in which private individuals (the public) do not act as consumers only, but also as contributors or producers”. For instance, instead of simply watching shows on the television, an individual can create a video and share it for others to watch on YouTube. 

In his Ted Talk, Henry Jenkins described participatory culture as a rich form of informal learning that includes:

  • “relatively low barriers to artistic expression and civic engagement”
  • “strong support for creating and sharing one’s creations with others”
  • “some type of informal mentorship whereby what is known by the most experienced is passed along to novices”
  • “members that believe their contributions matter”
  • “members that feel some degree of social connection with one another (at the least they care what other people think about what they have created)”

He also stated  that “Not every member must contribute, but all must believe they are free to contribute when ready and that what they contribute will be appropriately valued”. Now, imagine if all students felt valued when contributing to a class discussion… that would be amazing wouldn’t it?!

Wesch describes the phenomenon of silly dancing videos on YouTube as a “celebration of new forms of empowerment” (4:53). He says this is because anyone with a webcam has more of a presence and more of a voice. I absolutely agree with this. When people post online, they feel they are important because chances are there is someone listening to them. 

I absolutely see the value of the participatory culture. People feel empowered. People feel heard. People feel seen. It is important for people to feel this way! So if this a method for people to feel empowered, heard, or seen then I am all for it. 

However, I think it is incredibly necessary to teach the differences between what is empowering and what is not at a young age. We need to teach about online safety at a very young age, as students are becoming involved online very early on in their childhoods. This presence of the internet can be so incredibly damaging to a young person’s self esteem, and it can be dangerous as well.

In the early elementary years, we need to teach students not only how to be safe online, but how to choose what to engage with. We need to help students to differentiate what makes them feel good and what does not! If we help students to recognize their own feelings, we can help them protect their mental health. 

I definitely think that education will forever be changed after the pandemic and the major introduction to online school. There will always be students that enjoy face to face classes, but we are now more aware that some students are thriving in this online situation. The presence of technology in education will only increase from here on out. 

In the past, the idea of online school seemed completely unrealistic. Today, however, most families have a computer that allows them to participate in e-learning with their teacher. We are no longer stuck in the days of chalk boards and overhead projectors. Most schools now have more than one computer lab, and often have access to desktops, laptops, and iPads.

It is fascinating to imagine what future classrooms will look like.

Doing More with Smore!

Hello everyone! 

My new pal Cruz!

I hope you had a wonderful Thanksgiving and took some time for yourself. My Thanksgiving weekend was kind of amazing because my parents surprised us with a puppy! We now have an 8 week old mini Labradoodle and a 1 year old mini Aussiedoodle. To say it is a little hectic in my house right now is an understatement.

For this week’s blog post, we were challenged to try a new tool. I looked at the list of tools on our course weekly plans and decided to update you on my learning project through a newsletter! I think that this tool could be super handy for my non-profit or sending updates to parents. Creating a newsletter is also a great alternative to writing an essay and gives students a different opportunity to demonstrate their learning. 

SAMR is a technology integration model that helps us evaluate the use of technology and if it is enhancing or transforming the learning experiences of students. It stands for substitution, augmentation, modification, and redefinition. 

“File:The SAMR Model.jpg” by Lefflerd is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

At the substitution level, technology acts as a direct substitution with no functional change. An everyday example would be typing notes instead of using pen and paper. A e-newsletter like this could be substituted for a paper newsletter to parents informing them of school events. 

At the augmentation level, technology still acts as a substitution, but there is some functionality added. For instance, students could begin an online journal where others could comment. Augmentation could be demonstrated with creating an e-newsletter as Students could create and easily share them with one another to study from. 

At the modification level, technology begins to transform the learning experience and allow for task redesign.  A general example is using google docs to collaborate with classmates or even another class. An e-newsletter could act as a portfolio to show a student’s work, and could be sent to numerous friends and family members so that it could be shared with numerous people instead of just the people at home. 

At the redefinition level, the learning experience is transformed into something previously inconceivable. For example, students could attend a virtual field trip. An e-newsletter like this could allow this level of technology integration if it was used to create some social change or awareness in the community by being shared on social media or the news. Additionally, students could create a voiceover and share the newsletter with sound for those who are visually impaired or have a difficult time reading. 

I used Smore to create my newsletter because it was suggested on the tool list I chose from. It is very user friendly and easy to navigate. The free version of Smore limits the user to creating only 3 newsletters, but there is a discount for educators if you want to upgrade and use the website actively. 

The template options on Smore.

When you first begin to create your newsletter, you can create one from scratch or use a template. There are templates available for the following categories: Weekly Update, Class, Event, Business, For Sale, and Other. I chose the class template! From there, you can begin to add your text. The pre-made text boxes make it super easy to add your own content. Similar to our WordPress blogs, you can add different blocks for texts, pictures, events, etc. This way you can choose how you want to display your content. 

Creating my newsletter on Smore! The drop down list on the right are the possible theme options.

The customization on Smore is fairly limited, which I believe makes it more user friendly. I also think the lack of customization is perfect for classroom use, as students will be forced to focus on the content rather than endless customizations. When customizing your newsletter, you must choose a theme. Out of the six possible themes available, I used “vintage”. You can also choose your background, colours, and fonts from a limited selection. 

After adding content and designing the newsletter, it is time to export! There are more options for exporting if you are a paid user. For instance, only paid users can download their newsletters in pdf format. As a free user, you are able to email the newsletter, copy the link, and copy an embed code. Because I wanted to display my newsletter on this post, I decided to use the embed code. This is where I struggled. 

Smore has a feature that easily lets you copy the url or code, so I used that. Once I had the embed code, I was a little unsure of what to do since I have really only embedded links before. I tried to use both the “code” and “embed” widgets, but that was not working. I asked my classmates but they were not sure either, so I resorted to Google. It took me a while to find what I was looking for. I found a ton of articles that really just confused me more, and the first four videos I watched were from old versions of WordPress. But then I found this video and it was like the angels started singing. All I had to do was use the “Custom HTML” widget… who knew?! Once I pasted the code into that widget, I was good to go! I mean look at how gorgeous my newsletter is sitting up there. 

Before this week, I really had zero clue what a LMS was. All I really knew is that I would need some sort of online platform to host this course. Now I atleast have a basic knowledge of what a LMS is and some of the differences between them. I started to look at a few LMS online to figure out which one to use. I looked at Canvas, but I had to set up a phone call to get more information so I don’t have much of an opinion yet. I also looked at TalentLMS which I really liked. It seems to be very user friendly and have a ton of different features. I think I am going to set up a free account to see if it is something I will be able to use in the future. 

Thanks for reading!

x Paige Hamann

The one where I make a video and gain an even larger appreciation for e-learning teachers.

Welcome to my fourth learning project post: the one where I make a video and gain an even larger appreciation for e-learning teachers. 

But seriously! Not only is filming yourself speak so incredibly difficult and frustrating, but having to watch yourself back on film? Definitely not my cup of tea… but I have to get comfortable being uncomfortable (and you can totally tell I am uncomfortable when watching my video). 

This week, I started to actively look at the sources I collected and I began to gather information. I created a new document for research on each of the main topics so that it would be easier to navigate when starting to create content for each module or segment. For example, I currently have research documents for building relationships, as well as communication and engagement. 

Because I want this course to be effective, I know that I cannot rush it. Instead of trying to complete all of the topics at once and risk them being mediocre, I have decided to focus on two topics more thoroughly. This means that I will only be creating half the course throughout the duration of this project. I was still follow my outline as normal, I will just have to go back and add after the fact. 

The next step in my outline after researching is creating the learning objectives for the course! Essentially, I have to decide what it is exactly that I want participants to take away and be able to do upon completion. This is really difficult for me as I have never had to do anything like this before. I found a pdf that has a structure and list of verbs for creating objectives. I really appreciated the verb bank and I referred to it with every objective I created. The learning objectives that I created are in no way finalized. I will likely add or remove as time goes on, as well as reword, revise, and rethink to ensure that the most important material is included. As I start to create content, I will send my learning objectives to various people to see if they are reasonable and apt. Perhaps some of my EDTC300 classmates will be able to help me with this!

This past week, I started the Respect in Sport online course. It is a fairly long course, and because I am very busy I have not had the chance to finish it yet. However, I have a fairly good idea of how the course functions. I really like that the modules are broken down into segments, and that the amount of time it takes to complete each segment is visible. This way, if I only have 30 minutes before my next class, I know that I have enough time to complete the 7 minute segment. I feel that it helps me to manage my time more effectively. I appreciate that there is an outline for each segment as it helps me keep focused. Something that I do struggle with a bit is the presentation. The segments that I have completed so far have been a slideshow with a voice over. This makes me feel very disconnected and does not keep my attention. I would prefer a balance of a visual presentation,like a slideshow, and a video of the person speaking to me. I think that this feeling of connectedness would help me stay engaged with the content. 

Lastly, I would like to talk about actually creating my video. I used one of the chrome extensions we discussed in class called Screencastify. It was incredibly easy to download and use! I absolutely love that the video is ready to go as soon as you stop recording, and the fact that it automatically uploads to Google Drive is a gamechanger. I swear that exporting and uploading files can sometimes be the hardest part, but this extension has it all covered! I can definitely learn a bit more about the tools that you can use on the screen, but if I am being honest that was not quite a priority for me this video. My priority was making it through filming without crying. I was going to say yelling, but I did that multiple times out of frustration. I was not frustrated by the program by any means… I was frustrated with myself! I would be on a roll and then just completely blank and stare at the screen, so I had to restart numerous times. Or I would really stumble on a sentence and I would have to refilm it! I do not even want to know how many times I attempted to film this simple five minute long video. It really is not perfect, but at least I did it! Watching the video of myself after was just excruciating (maybe I am a little dramatic). I mean I don’t think there are a ton of people who like listening to their voices on recording. All in all, I started to familiarize myself with a tool that I will likely use again in the future, so really I call that a win. HUGE shoutout to all of the e-learning teachers right now who have had to tackle this! I hope it hasn’t caused you as much anxiety as it did for me. 

Thanks for tuning in to this week’s post! 

x Paige Hamann

I Wasn’t a Quitter & Now I Love Twitter!

Welcome back!

Over the course of this class so far, I have realized that I absolutely love Twitter. I have used Twitter in the past, but I never truly understood it. I think that is partially because I have never used it in a professional setting before, and I only compared it to my other personal social media. My personal social media accounts are more so filled with my friend’s vacation photos (it’s almost like a popularity contest) rather than thought-provoking content. I have involved myself much more in the news, politics, and such and Twitter displays a lot more of this content than my Facebook or Instagram accounts which I really enjoy. It is almost as if Twitter is the most mature form of social media because it can truly be used in a professional sense! 

My Twitter Profile

I think that Twitter is an amazing tool for educators. I am not so sure of my feelings towards Twitter in the classroom setting as I need to explore that more in depth, but it is an amazing tool to connect with others. By connecting with other educators on Twitter, you are able to learn about other philosophies, lessons, resources, crafts, tools, etc. If you are struggling with anything, there is an entire teacher community who is willing to support you and give you advice. It really allows teachers to continue growing and learning from others. 

That being said, Twitter is still Social Media and it is still important to be careful when using it. It is important to be aware of what you post and interact with, but it is also incredibly important to not compare yourself to others. Like any other socials, it can be draining and exhausting, so it is important to manage your time on Twitter in a manner that works for you. 

Last Wednesday, my EDTC 300 class and I were able to participate in a special edition of the Sask Ed Chat on Twitter! For those of you who are not familiar, Sask Ed Chat happens once a week on Twitter, and a moderator will post questions for educators to respond to. It is a great chance to connect with others in the field of education and grow your PLN!

My TweetDeck Account

I am really excited to continue to grow my LPN on Twitter. I have already connected with so many people and learned so much. 

To keep up with all of the questions and responses, I used TweetDeck! TweetDeck allows you to open columns so that you can see multiple things at once. It saves you from having to sort through everything and constantly hitting refresh. For example, I had columns open for my home page, notifications, #saskedchat, and the moderators account. Having my notifications open allowed me to see if anyone interacted with my tweets or replied to my comments. The #saskedchat column let me see all of the tweets using that hashtag, so on Wednesday, I could see everyone’s responses to the questions! This is super important because the purpose of the chat is to communicate with others, share ideas, and learn from one another. Lastly, because I had the moderator’s account open in a column, I was able to see all his tweets– which were the questions! This made it much easier to navigate and find the questions. Having all of these columns open is definitely not for everyone. It is very overwhelming at first because there are so many things to look at and respond to. 

Check out what’s going on in my Twitter!

x Paige Hamann

Coaching Coaches: The Behind the Scenes Work

Hey! Welcome back. 

As a little recap, I am creating an online mental health course for coaches. Athletics often cause excessive stress and anxiety, and helping coaches to understand and prevent this will hopefully have a positive effect on the mental health of athletes!

Throughout the last few weeks, I created and analyzed a survey to understand what it is that athletes are struggling with, and from there I decided the main topics for the course. This past week, I started to research the topics in order to create learning objectives and content!

To organize my research, I created categories based on the main topics I decided for the course. I am currently organizing my research in a Google Doc because it is what I am most familiar and comfortable with. In my document, I have created the following headings: building relationships, communication and encouragement, body image, post-competition, multi-sport athletes, and miscellaneous. By creating these headings, I am able to navigate the portion of the course I would like to focus on. 

Because the research needed for this course will be quite extensive, I have only started to collect article titles and sources that seem relevant to the topics. I have been using the Google search engine to look for articles regarding the main topics. Once Google provides me with a list of websites, I quickly look at those whose titles seem applicable. After quickly scanning and skimming the text, I decide if it will be useful. If it is not useful, I simply return to looking for more sources. If it does seem pertinent, I copy the title and url to the appropriate heading in my Google Doc!

After I gather a few more sources, I will begin to dive into the articles and find quotations and information to use in the course. I need to ensure that I have the proper research backing this course because mental health is incredibly fragile. I will continue to collect more information, but I will also start to analyze it in the coming days as well. 

An aspect that I did not include in my outline is participating in courses that have already been created. Before starting this project, I completed the Mental Health Awareness for Sport and Physical Activity online course from UK Coaching in preparation for creating my own course. I really did not take anything away from this course, and felt the information was too general and is already accessible to most people. Even though I did not learn anything specific to the topic, I learned about what I want to see in my own course and how I would like to communicate it. I decided that I am going to look for other courses similar to the one I am creating in order to improve my own!

This is definitely not the most exciting learning project and I don’t have much to show for it right now, but I am really hoping it will make a difference! Maybe some of you can help to test the course before it launches!

Thanks for tuning in!

x Paige Hamann

Flirting with Feedly

Navigating the Twitter world can definitely be challenging. There is just so much going on, and it is sometimes hard to find what you’re looking for. But, like everything these days, there is an app for that! Well really, it is an RSS reader. To help me explore and genuinely use Twitter as a useful platform, I decided to use Feedly!

Deciding what sources to follow is rather easy! You simply search the topic you’re looking for, and a list of sources that post that type of content appears. When a source appears, it will tell you how many followers it has, the average amount of articles it posts and how frequently, and a short bio. You can then click on the source and read the different articles they have posted. 

I have not yet started to use Feedly to its full potential as I am having a few technical difficulties (perfect timing, right?). Albeit, I have started to follow a few sources who share some amazing resources! So far, I have mainly started to follow sources that frequently post about ed tech (which is quite fitting for this class). 

A source that I find and quite enjoy is Edutopia. They post short YouTube videos, which is sometimes refreshing after reading articles and textbooks all day. Currently, Edutopia is a mix of tips for online education, as well as anti-racist education. Both of which are extremely prevalent as a result of the recent Black Lives Matter movement and the switch to remote learning due to Covid-19. 

Another source that I followed is TeachThought. TeachThought shares about 3 articles a week, so they are present in my feed but not overwhelming. They share a variety of topics on education, but the one that caught my attention is “20 Ways to Bring Joy Back To Your Classroom”. They also share many resources about virtual learning and digital spaces which is very relevant. 

I am really looking forward to finding sources that are pertinent to me and my followers! 

A view of my Feedly account!

x Paige Hamann

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly in Athletics.

Hey everyone!

Thanks for tuning back into my learning project. I hope you had a fantastic week.

Last week, I introduced the course I am creating and explained a little bit about why I decided that it was necessary. You can check out that post here!

This week, I decided to analyze the answers from the survey and decide on the major course topics. If I am being quite honest with you, reading the survey results is not easy for me. It reminds me of the time I spent struggling, and it makes me think of how many other people are struggling too. I know that it is not something to become hung up on because we are working to make a difference in this area, but it still absolutely breaks my heart. I guess that’s what happens when you’re an empath!

But, let’s dive right in to the results from the survey! I shared this survey on Instagram, but it is not yet closed because I would like to allow others to share their experiences as well. However, there have been 93 responses thus far. Out of the 93 responses, 82.8% said that the sport they played had a negative impact on their mental health. 79.6% of responses said that coaches specifically had a negative impact on their mental health. This is incredibly alarming to me, and likely to you as well. It is clear that there is a serious issue in the athletic community, but it appears as if there is little being done to change that. That is why I chose to actively address this topic. That 82.8% of responses should not exist. 

The survey also listed the following statements, and asked people to select the aspects that had a negative impact on their mental health. The numbers following the statement indicate the number of people (out of 93) and total percentage of responses that agreed the statement negatively affected their mental health. 

  • Pressure put on yourself. 86  92.5%
  • Pressure from parents. 39 41.0%
  • Pressure from teammates. 42 45.2%
  • Pressure from coaches 70. 75.3%
  • Injury. 48 51.6%
  • Language used by coaches. 33 35.5%
  • Language used by teammates. 25 26.9%
  • Stress from a busy schedule. 73 78.5%
  • Wanting to quit the sport. 51 54.8%
  • Negative self-talk. 69 74.2%
  • Lack of encouragement. 62 66.7%

Additionally, the survey asked to explain why the participant’s mental health was affected by the previous statements they chose. Here are a few snippets of their responses. 

  • “The coaches would make me feel attacked with the terminology they used”
  • “The coach frequently made comments about weight… and told me she thought I would’ve been skinnier coming back from a 6 week liquid diet after surgery”
  • “Sometimes it’s so hard to keep pushing yourself when you’re not getting results and all you have is negative feedback”
  • “Having coaches personally target me with angry language made me feel really incapable”
  • “Even after a win the only thing I’d hear from coaches and parents were critiques, and even though I think it’s helpful, the way it was communicated made me feel like I was doing everything wrong”
  • “I felt like I always was needed to perform and couldn’t have a bad day. There wasn’t time for me to struggle and be down and feel emotions during practice or game”

We also asked the participants what they wanted future coaches to know, and what we can do differently to ensure that athletics have a positive impact on the mental health of athletes? Here are some of their answers. 

  • “Just because somebody needs to hear harsher words as motivation in a game or competition doesn’t mean they don’t need encouragement and softer language once it’s over”
  • “Make sure there is an equal balance of tough love as well as reassurance”
  • “Training and competition is not the only place stress comes from”
  • “Get to know your players and realize that one style of coaching doesn’t fit everyone”
  • “Coaches should learn about positive body image and ways to promote it with their team, as well as promoting healthy habits surrounding the athletes’ bodies”
  • “Have regular conversations with your athletes, get to know them personally, recognize when they are ready to be pushed and when they need a break”
  • “Talking to a player individually after a game or during half-time and speaking kindly to them or showing that you care can go a long way”
  • “Always check in on your players, even the ones who seem happy”

Lastly, the survey asked the participants what had a positive impact on their mental health. Here are some of the responses. 

  • “Coaches that make a point of caring about you as a person”
  • “Having team bonding exercises where we talked about mental health & got vulnerable with each other”
  • “Conversations with other high level athletes who have had other mental health struggles like mine”
  • “One time, my team was going through a losing streak, we had lost 4 games in a row and were in a rut. We were all feeling so much pressure, and in turn were playing stressed and poorly. Recognizing this, my coach cancelled one of our practices leading up to the next game, and replaced it with yoga and a team dinner. This really helped us to get back on track and in the next game, we beat the number 2 team in my city. We played so much better and were so much looser and had way more fun! Our coach recognized that our team mental health was affecting our play and helped us through it”
  • “I once had a talk with a coach who had struggled with mental health. In hearing her story, I was able to understand where she was coming from and also put to words some of the struggles I had been facing”

Ultimately, the survey responses reiterated a few major ideas. 1) Athletes want to be cared about as human beings. 2) Athletes want to be encouraged. 3) Athletes want to  be respected. 4) Athletes want and need communication. 

  1. Athletes want to be cared about as human beings. From my own personal experiences, chatting with others, and the survey responses, it has become clear to me that athletes want to be seen as more than just an athlete. They want to make real life connections, and they want their coaches to care about their lives outside of the sport. 
  2. Athletes want to be encouraged. Athletes tend to fixate on their own mistakes for longer than needed. This means that they do not need their coaches to continually focus on them as well. Instead, athletes need to be given constructive criticism and encouragement so that they are able to move forward instead of dwelling on their past mistake. 
  3. Athletes want to be respected. Athletes want their emotions, bodies, and skills to be respected. They want their coaches to acknowledge their emotions and allow them to feel that way. They don’t want to be forced into unhealthy habits or be ridiculed into having a body that the coach thinks is ideal. They want coaches to know that people will be at different skill levels but that each player has a specific role. 
  4. Athletes want and need communication. Communication varies person to person and that needs to be addressed. Coaches need to acknowledge how their players like to communicate so that safe space is there when they need to confide or share. 

I think that these four ideas will be the main topics in the course. From here, I will begin researching the major topics to create content. I definitely think that creating the content will be the most difficult part of this project. Things might change along the way, but I am expecting that! 

Thanks for reading!

Until next time, 

x Paige Hamann

Coaching Coaches: Mental Health Edition

I grew up as an elite athlete. I started playing basketball in grade one, and I excelled right from the get go. In grade five, I joined a track club where I quickly became successful. No matter the sport I played, I would thrive. In 2012, I qualified for the North American Championship in Hershey, PA, where I placed seventh in the 800m. I played on multiple provincial basketball teams, and started on my high school’s Senior basketball team as a freshman. 

In grade ten, I suffered through the peak of my severe anxiety and depression. I had suffered with mental illness since approximately seventh grade, however it worsened more than I ever could have imagined. On May 15th 2017, things took a turn for the worse. A teammate of mine from my U15  Sask season committed suicide. Tori’s death completely changed my life, and I miss her every single day. After Tori’s passing, I fell into an even deeper depression. On July 26th, while on a U16 basketball trip in Langley, I almost took my own life. Thankfully, I reached out for help at the last second. 

The Youth Caring Award 2019

Since then, my life has changed completely and I am grateful to wake up everyday. I have taken control of my own mental health, and taken initiative in my community. I organized Mikans for Mental Health, which raised over $5000 for Family Service Regina in 2018. I have spoken at multiple I Got Mind events, and the Sask Advocate “Now in My Day” conference. In September of 2019, I was honoured to receive the Youth Caring Award from The Caring Place. In March 2020, I raised $3000 through my little photography business and the Porch Project. The funds I received from the Youth Caring Award and the Porch Project have been donated to Inside the Box: A Mental Health Initiative. 

WOOF. Now, to the important stuff! Inside the Box: A Mental Health Initiative is a non-profit organization that I started in July! Inside the Box aims to promote mental health and well-being in athletics through awareness, conversation, education, and reflection. We have an amazing executive team and board of directors. I decided to start this organization because of my own negative experiences with mental health and sport, and I know of many others who had similar experiences. I also realized that suicide is greatly affecting young  athletes in my community. I recognized this, and decided to try and make a change in the athletic community. 

One of the logos for Inside the Box

We decided that we wanted to create a course for coaches due to our own experiences as an executive team. Coaches are typically major role models, and whether they know it or not, have an unbelievable impact on their athletes’ mental health. This can be a positive or negative impact. We want this course to help coaches be a positive force in their athletes’ lives, while minimizing the negative impacts they might have. 

In order to move forward on this project, I knew that I would have to create an outline. But, I asked myself “How the heck do I make an outline for this?”. So… guess what my first step was? Researching outlines for the creation of an online course. Yep, that’s right. I researched an outline to help me make an outline. That just seems so silly to me, but I now in fact have an outline for this project! So here it is:

  • Research outlines for creating online courses. Here are some of the sources I used: Learn Worlds, Thinkific, and Foundr
  • Create my learning project outline
  • Create a survey to send to athletes. This will help us determine what to put in the course!
  • Decide on a course topic
  • Research the subject and speak to professionals 
  • Plan the course outline 
  • Write learning goals and objectives
  • Choose eLearning platform
  • Create course content
  • Upload to platform
  • Test launch and gather feedback
  • Launch and market

I created this survey for any athletes to fill out. We will not be using it for research purposes so I was not worried about technicalities. This survey will just help us determine what athletes are struggling with so we can add to our course!

This project is a HUGE task! I have to ensure that all information I include is accurate and relevant, and will not end up harming the mental health of athletes to come. I will be communicating with professionals quite regularly, so I am not worried at all. There is a possibility that this project will not be entirely completed by the end of this course, but that is okay!

I am so excited for the opportunity to work on a passion of mine in a University class. I hope you enjoy this journey!

x Paige Hamann

Hey there!

Welcome to my blog. I am super excited that you are here!

My name is Paige Hamann and I am currently a second year Secondary Education student majoring in Social Studies and minoring in English. Bring on all the social justice! 

Here are some fun facts about me:

Buehrle J.A
  • I am the Founder and President of a mental health non-Profit organization. 
  • My favourite colour is pink, but I have really been digging earthy colours recently
  • My family names our dogs after Blue Jays players. We currently have a one year old dog named Buehrle J.A (after Mark Buehrle and J.A Happ)
  • I have always wanted to start a blog but was too anxious (this is a fabulous excuse to overcome a fear)

Yes, I was scared to start a blog… I know it sounds silly, but as someone with severe social anxiety I was terrified of what people would think! Would people even read it? What if I ran out of things to write about? What if people think I’m weird? “What ifs” can be deadly. 

However, Edtc 300 is making me say sayonara to my fear of creating a blog. So instead of simply drowning in my anxiety and resenting this course, I have decided to embrace my “what ifs”. What if people actually like the things I write? What if this method of writing and communication is an amzing outlet for me? What if this blog helps me to make connections with other educators? Most importantly, what if this blog helps me to overcome my other fears? It’s all about perspective.

I think educational technology is one of the coolest tools ever! In a few months, I can definitely see myself being a edtc nerd… but I am more than okay with that! People today are more immersed in technology than ever before, and it only makes sense for educators to take advantage of that. 

Although elements of technology have been present through the entirety of my education, I only started to appreciate the extent of it in eighth grade. My grade eight teacher really appreciated technology and so our classroom dove right in. We actively used twitter in our classroom, and we even planned an entire field trip to downtown Regina via Twitter. Our class really learned how to communicate with our community in safe and meaningful ways.

I feel that although technology was definitely used in my schools, it was not used to its full potential, and that is totally okay! I do not feel that I missed out on anything because technology was not omnipresent in my classroom. That being said, if I can learn how to utilise technology to grow as an educator and engage my students, then I am absolutely on board!

Thanks for reading & joining me on this journey!

X Paige Hamann